Local Agriculture News

People across the country are receiving unsolicited packages of unidentified seeds in the mail that seem to be coming from China. The Office of Indiana State Chemist, located at Purdue Univers…

National Agriculture News

If I knew all I needed to do was complain about dryness to make it rain, I would have done it a few weeks earlier. While everyone was reading my previous article we were in the middle of a weeklong 5-8-inch rain event. I would say it helped about half the crop; the earlier maturities on lighter soil had already shut down. But the longer-day crops will benefit greatly from the rains. This week should mark the beginning of wide-scale harvest in our area. Most people are thinking they have some soybeans ready to cut as well as a few corn fields. I was in a field of early-maturing soybeans this past week. They were ready to be harvested though the bean size was small due to dry weather in August.

MADISON, Wis. – Al Gunderson says it’s difficult to put into words what it means to earn the Honorary Recognition Award from the University of Wisconsin-College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. It would be difficult to say what UW-Madison along with animal science and nutrition mean to a man who has lived them his entire life.

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South Dakota researchers have taken a closer look at the function of dung beetles in eastern South Dakota during the past few years. Their findings are related to management of livestock grazing and chemical pesticides in relation to dung beetle and insect-community health.

Harvest season is underway in some pockets of the Midwest, and for producers looking to lock in profits, a lot could change very quickly in the markets.

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The Haney soil health test, named for U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist Rick Haney, includes more than a dozen different soil-test values. Those include standard macro- and micro-nutrients for plant consumption, but what’s different about the Haney test is that it also estimates nutrients for microbial consumption, focusing on how much carbon and nitrogen is in the soil.

The second and third weeks of September were colder than normal near Lake Superior. Inland areas, especially lowland, suffered early frost. The area of the lakeshore near and including the city of Superior remained abnormally dry while the rest of the lakeshore had adequate moisture. Patches of forest were brilliant red and orange, but peak colors had yet to arrive.

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U.S. Highway 8 cuts across northern Wisconsin like an asphalt dance floor. I saw an occasional burst of yellow and red as I traveled to my woodlot from a weekend at my off-grid cabin. Fall is knocking at the door.

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Decades from now observers will reflect on key statistics such as unemployment and the gross domestic product, and note how numerous conditions in 2020 hit unfavorable records. In a year full of extremes this week’s post reviews what we consider to be the most interesting and insightful chart of 2020 – U.S. gasoline consumption.

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Nobody can deny that fall is here. Frost and freeze warnings have covered much of the state of Wisconsin at least once. Our growing season is coming to a rapid close.

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OPINION  There’s a term swirling around the countryside these days – “Trump money.” It refers to the growing pile of subsidies hitting farm country during this – maybe not so coincidentally – election year. President Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Wisconsin announced a new $13 billion federal-aid package that will benefit farmers through another round of Coronavirus Food Assistance Program payments. Coupled with this spring’s $16 billion relief package overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, we’re entering record-breaking territory in farm subsidies.

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The 2020 growing season is quickly coming to an end. What a great week it was for chopping corn silage. By the time this article is printed most of the state will have finished corn-silage harvesting.

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MADISON, Wis. – Claire Huschka Sink’s career has been nontraditional. She was the only female on the University of Wisconsin-Madison livestock-judging team in the early 1960s. And by retirement the alumna of the University of Wisconsin-College of Agricultural and Life Sciences had worked decades for the U.S. Department of Energy. She recently was recognized for her distinguished career by the UW college.