Teaching is not an easy job, and like any profession has its own unique stressors. Instructing special needs students is a departure from teaching in a traditional classroom environment, with particular circumstances and challenges that change the dynamic even more.

No matter what’s going on or where it might be going on, time is often of the essence when it comes to just about anything. The clock can be one of the biggest barriers to finding consistent routines, especially when it comes to exercising on a regular basis. But it doesn’t have to be. Check out how to squeeze in a quick yet still-effective workout that can generate real results, even if only 30 minutes are up for grabs.

The freezer section is a grocery store favorite — from frozen dinners to frosty desserts, it’s brimming with quick, affordable and delicious items. However, for some, consuming frozen products that contain dairy can lead to stomach issues and discomfort. For those who try to cut out ice cream and other cheesy entrees, don’t let that stop you from stocking up on microwave-ready delights while grocery shopping. We’ve rounded up some non-dairy and low-dairy favorites.

The world is perilous enough for the average senior citizen without a highly contagious, potentially deadly new virus causing a global outbreak of disease.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is caused when an individual witnesses or experiences a tragic event. Though they may not surface for months or years, symptoms include sleeplessness, depression, a heightened state of anxiety, flashbacks to the event and avoidance of places, people or activities that are reminders of the trauma. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), 7.7 million adults in the U.S. live with PTSD, though women are more likely to develop this condition.

One of the most commonly searched questions about breastfeeding is, “What medicines can you take?” Since everything you consume makes its way into your baby’s milk supply, it’s a valid concern. Sure, we know to pump and dump after a couple glasses of wine, but what about medications?

While working out at home has become a necessity for many — with gyms closed during the coronavirus pandemic — home fitness had already been trending before quarantines began. Interactive home workout products such as Peloton, Zwift, Mirror and Tonal are changing the fitness landscape. Convenience and safety are two major plusses that these home streaming platforms offer, according to John Mercer, professor and acting chair of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and the president of the Las Vegas Triathlon Club. “For cycling, a lot of people are reporting that they just feel safer biking indoors rather than being out on the streets,” Mercer says. “It’s not always easy to find routes to exercise outside that are safe. “You can also do it on your own schedule, and you can probably even be a little more efficient with your time. You don’t have to stop at a light or a stop sign.” Mercer says technological advances have allowed home platforms to offer a more interesting workout experience than home equipment provided in the past. “What’s available now are programs that can control the level of resistance,” he adds. “You can have the resistance changed based on a simulated hill or a different type of road condition. That makes it more fun. “People are also able to reach others on a program like Zwift, where they get on their bikes and have a little bit of competition. You can have virtual races where you upload data from a run or an indoor bike ride. Ironman Triathlon is doing these virtual races and so is the United States Triathlon Association.” Stan Lim, photography manager at the University of California-Riverside, is an avid cycler who has realized some of the benefits of working out at home after moving his rides inside during the pandemic. “All my rides were with groups, usually,” he says. “So, I had to change that. I had a bit of a home cycling studio set up, with a couple different bikes that were basically just collecting dust. I figured now was the time to get it set up. “My daughter is home from college, and Peloton was offering a free 90-day subscription, so I figured I’d set it up. It’s been great riding with my daughter at home.” Lim echoes some of Mercer’s sentiments about the positives of riding at home. “The one thing about being at home is safety,” he says. “I don’t have a chance of getting hit by a car. That’s a big thing. Plus being able to just go in the garage and get a quick workout in, it’s very convenient.” Lim says he had noticed many of his fellow riders gravitating toward virtual workouts before the pandemic. “A lot of my friends started getting into Zwift because there are so many features you can use with that,” he adds. “Especially when the weather isn’t great, everyone was jumping on Zwift and getting their workouts in that way. “I know I’ll continue to do this more even when I’m able to get back to going outside. Especially if I get home late from work and don’t have time to go ride outside, I can just do it at home.” Garrett Borunda, vice president of partnerships and platforms at EGYM, says it is important for gyms to embrace and incorporate technology. EGYM offers three major platforms for gyms to utilize: connected equipment that allows gym customers to set up an account and be offered a customized program each time they return to that machine, apps that allow gyms to communicate with customers and utilize virtual programs, and passes for companies to provide their employees with gym, aquatic club and racquet club memberships. “In general, we all know we need to be healthier,” Borunda says. “We want to push to get out there and exercise. We know it is the right thing to do. But there’s often obstacles in the way. Technology offers us an opportunity to get around those obstacles.” Borunda believes technology can help people get past anxiety that may limit their trips to the gym. “If you’re on your device working out at home, you’re not intimidated by being in the club,” he says. “You’re seeing the progress you’re making right on your device and getting rewarded for it, and with the immense amount of content out there, you’re not going to get bored.”

Migraine headache is a recurrent, disabling neurologic condition that affects about one in six people in the United States. It’s twice as common in women than men and is more likely to affect people between the ages of 18 and 59. These are years of great potential work productivity, and uncontrolled migraine is therefore associated with high costs due to both absenteeism and presenteeism (lacking the ability to perform at one’s full potential). Many migraines respond well to treatment. Studies of people with migraines in the U.S., however, show that access to care and receiving the correct diagnosis are both barriers to adequate treatment.

We are approaching what are probably the most common “cheat” eating days—the time between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. By planning ahead and following a few simple tips, you can resist overindulging during the holidays, and beyond.