Staying at home during the coronavirus outbreak can help you avoid contracting the potentially deadly pathogen. Arming your immune system and creating a natural shield by eating foods rich in essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants can help you fight off an infection, whether it is COVID-19 or other viruses and bacterium.

You’ve likely read a lot about the coronavirus or talked about it with friends or co-workers. It’s been on almost every major news outlet website, newspaper or TV station in the last few months. The coronavirus was first detected in China, and it’s now been detected in about 60 locations internationally, including the U.S., according to the Centers and Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

There’s no shortage of medical information on the internet; so, when it comes to men and prostate cancer, how do you separate myth from fact? What about dated and current information?

It’s time to face the facts: The incessant noise of modern life never seems to stop. It also seems that persistent and loud environmental noise — traffic, construction, urban racket and even war may cause or contribute to cardiovascular problems.

As we all know, America, and the world, is facing an unprecedented time right now. Many people are working from home or out of work completely, and many schools are in their first week of closures. This means that parents and students are experiencing a time that they likely haven’t before, in which the whole family is home together all day, every day.

For many women, giving birth to a baby may trigger an assortment of emotions, including joy, excitement, anxiety and even fear. But it could also lead to something you may not expect. Most new mothers experience a milder form of depression, sometimes commonly called “the baby blues,” after childbirth. Other new moms, however, can experience a more severe, long-lasting form called postpartum depression.

If you’re on the hunt for a workout that will help you burn major calories, sculpt your upper and lower body and lower stress levels, then look no further. It may be time for you to put on a pair of gloves and try boxing. It’s a one-stop sweat that can leave you feeling great from the inside out.

Discussing mental health has become less taboo in modern culture than it used to be before, and that openness is now also crossing over into the workplace. However, many organizations still seem to be falling behind on this trend. From unrealistic, demanding deadlines to heavy workloads and long hours to even shifting performance priorities, there’s often never a shortage of stress at work.

On Jan. 14, Community Health published story titled "No More Body Shaming" that contained quotes from a source who levied unfounded allegations of impropriety against White Rock Montessori school in Dallas. Allegations that White Rock Montessori condoned or allowed instances of body shaming against students, and is now retaliating against the children of parents who raise such issues with the school, are unsubstantiated and solely the opinion of the source quoted in the story. Community Health apologizes to White Rock Montessori for any harm that has come to its reputation and its business as a respected educational institute as a result of the statements contained in the story.

As families come face to face with medical requirements every school year, the country is feeling the effects of a vaccine resistance movement that’s been decades in the making. In a climate of fake news and ever-growing misinformation that is spread online, it can be hard to decipher the false information from the truth. That’s why Facebook is taking a stand.

If you are looking for a yoga studio in Montgomery County, perhaps Kindred Yoga is for you.

Your life is busy. Work, appointments, grocery shopping, cooking, driving your kids around – there are all sorts of excuses to put off getting an annual influenza (flu) vaccine. To make it easier for its employees to get their flu shot, Colonial School District holds an annual flu shot clinic at its Central District Office. This is the fifth year the district has held its clinic on Oct. 21.

Discussing mental health has become less taboo in modern culture than it used to be before, and that openness is now also crossing over into the workplace. However, many organizations still seem to be falling behind on this trend. From unrealistic, demanding deadlines to heavy workloads and long hours to even shifting performance priorities, there’s often never a shortage of stress at work.

Almost immediately after birth a child begins to imitate their parents. They mimic mannerisms and behaviors such as smiling when their parents smile, make similar noises and, when they are old enough to talk, they repeat what parents say.

The American Society for the Positive Care of Children estimates that child abuse reports involve 7.5 million children, and child abuse crosses all socioeconomic and educational levels, religions, ethnic and cultural groups. The National Children’s Alliance has reported that nearly 700,000 children are abused in the U.S annually. Childhelp.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention and treatment of child abuse, found that a report of child abuse is made every 10 seconds.

One way to achieve mental health, happiness and clarity is through meditation. What meditation does is uniquely dynamic — allowing your whole being to open up, decluttering your thoughts, feelings and emotions into a positive state of confidence.

In 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency, and it announced a five-point strategy to battle the opioid epidemic. Since then, the fight has been nonstop, with mainstream approaches like medicine and counseling, legislation like the 2018 Opioid Crisis Response Act, and even more holistic ways like using medical marijuana.

An estimated 5.8 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2019, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This includes an estimated 5.6 million people age 65 and older and 200,000 people younger than 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia. It’s a disease that Amy Losak of Teaneck, New Jersey, knows all too well.

Vaping has come of age in the most perfect of social conditions. Smoking cigarettes is falling out of favor socially and even among nicotine users, and is wholly rejected by many young people today. To get their fix they're turning to what is marketed as a cleaner and safer method of ingestion. Enticing flavors, edgy technology and social media are empowering the tobacco industry to ensnare a new generation with nicotine addiction
by way of vaping. And it’s working. In 2016, 43.8% of high schoolers in New York state tried vaping, more than double the total two years prior. This trend has Ontario County officials deeply concerned.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is caused when an individual witnesses or experiences a tragic event. Though they may not surface for months or years, symptoms include sleeplessness, depression, a heightened state of anxiety, flashbacks to the event and avoidance of places, people or activities that are reminders of the trauma. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), 7.7 million adults in the U.S. live with PTSD, though women are more likely to develop this condition.

With spring finally in the air, most of us can’t wait to get outside and soak up some sun. With May being Skin Cancer Awareness Month, it's a great time to be reminded about the importance of skin care, particularly when it comes to protecting it from damaging and potentially cancer-causing ultraviolet radiation.

Junior high school is a critical time of growth and development for students. Whether they’re trying to make new friends, join an extracurricular activity or sport, or navigate a homecoming dance, youths within that demographic are full of emotions they might not know how to express or cope with.

An estimated 5.8 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2019, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This includes an estimated 5.6 million people age 65 and older and 200,000 people younger than 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia. It’s a disease that Amy Losak of Teaneck, New Jersey, knows all too well.

Recent estimates have shown that about one in six American children between ages 3 and 17 have one or more developmental disabilities — impairments in learning, language, physical or behavior. These conditions begin during the developmental period, can affect everyday functioning, and generally last throughout a person’s life.

The mass-shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and schools around the nation last year ignited a debate on mental health and the need to prevent young people from slipping through the cracks.

More Americans than ever before in are legally taking prescription drugs. Pharmaceutical prices are increasing about 8 percent per year – more than four times the rate of wage growth and inflation. Consequently, if you want the top brand name pharmaceuticals, you may, depending on what your health plan covers, be paying a hefty chunk of change to get them.

As cliché as it may sound, it’s also a fact: Doing good is good for everyone. Altruism is beneficial to your mental health, physical well-being and sense of belonging. A recent study revealed that volunteering for as little as two hours every week can be instrumental to your health. The same study found that out of all the do-gooders who spent their free time helping others 93 percent reported an improved mood, 79 percent reported decreased stress levels and 88 percent felt a boost in their self-esteem.

As part of an effort to keep students front and center regarding plans for preparedness, staff at Seneca Valley School District recently participated in the first “Stop the Bleed” training to learn the basics of bleeding control, how to use dressings and how to use a tourniquet properly.