Independence Day is around the corner. Families are likely prepping to watch or set off fireworks and sparklers. However, the Fourth of July celebration might turn a fun-filled day into a painful memory if caution isn’t properly exercised. Even the most innocent-looking fire displays can lead to injuries or an actual fire. Consider these safety tips to enjoy the holiday without going to the emergency room.

Michigan voters in November 2018 passed a ballot measure that legalized cannabis for recreational use, making the Great Lakes State the first in the Midwest to do so. The state’s retail cannabis market opened in late 2019 and within the first two weeks yielded $3.1 million in sales. By Jan. 2, 2020, that had reached $6.5 million.

While working out at home has become a necessity for many — with gyms closed during the coronavirus pandemic — home fitness had already been trending before quarantines began. Interactive home workout products such as Peloton, Zwift, Mirror and Tonal are changing the fitness landscape. Convenience and safety are two major plusses that these home streaming platforms offer, according to John Mercer, professor and acting chair of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and the president of the Las Vegas Triathlon Club. “For cycling, a lot of people are reporting that they just feel safer biking indoors rather than being out on the streets,” Mercer says. “It’s not always easy to find routes to exercise outside that are safe. “You can also do it on your own schedule, and you can probably even be a little more efficient with your time. You don’t have to stop at a light or a stop sign.” Mercer says technological advances have allowed home platforms to offer a more interesting workout experience than home equipment provided in the past. “What’s available now are programs that can control the level of resistance,” he adds. “You can have the resistance changed based on a simulated hill or a different type of road condition. That makes it more fun. “People are also able to reach others on a program like Zwift, where they get on their bikes and have a little bit of competition. You can have virtual races where you upload data from a run or an indoor bike ride. Ironman Triathlon is doing these virtual races and so is the United States Triathlon Association.” Stan Lim, photography manager at the University of California-Riverside, is an avid cycler who has realized some of the benefits of working out at home after moving his rides inside during the pandemic. “All my rides were with groups, usually,” he says. “So, I had to change that. I had a bit of a home cycling studio set up, with a couple different bikes that were basically just collecting dust. I figured now was the time to get it set up. “My daughter is home from college, and Peloton was offering a free 90-day subscription, so I figured I’d set it up. It’s been great riding with my daughter at home.” Lim echoes some of Mercer’s sentiments about the positives of riding at home. “The one thing about being at home is safety,” he says. “I don’t have a chance of getting hit by a car. That’s a big thing. Plus being able to just go in the garage and get a quick workout in, it’s very convenient.” Lim says he had noticed many of his fellow riders gravitating toward virtual workouts before the pandemic. “A lot of my friends started getting into Zwift because there are so many features you can use with that,” he adds. “Especially when the weather isn’t great, everyone was jumping on Zwift and getting their workouts in that way. “I know I’ll continue to do this more even when I’m able to get back to going outside. Especially if I get home late from work and don’t have time to go ride outside, I can just do it at home.” Garrett Borunda, vice president of partnerships and platforms at EGYM, says it is important for gyms to embrace and incorporate technology. EGYM offers three major platforms for gyms to utilize: connected equipment that allows gym customers to set up an account and be offered a customized program each time they return to that machine, apps that allow gyms to communicate with customers and utilize virtual programs, and passes for companies to provide their employees with gym, aquatic club and racquet club memberships. “In general, we all know we need to be healthier,” Borunda says. “We want to push to get out there and exercise. We know it is the right thing to do. But there’s often obstacles in the way. Technology offers us an opportunity to get around those obstacles.” Borunda believes technology can help people get past anxiety that may limit their trips to the gym. “If you’re on your device working out at home, you’re not intimidated by being in the club,” he says. “You’re seeing the progress you’re making right on your device and getting rewarded for it, and with the immense amount of content out there, you’re not going to get bored.”

Building and maintaining a strong immune system is not exactly a walk in the park under normal circumstances.

Women who survive breast cancer can serve as beacons of strength, encouragement and hope. Each story is as unique as the individual who lived it, but many of them share one commonality: It started with a mammogram.

Providing patient-centered care is a point of pride for any health service organization. That is certainly true at Armstrong Center for Medicine and Health (ACMH)and Indiana Regional Medical Center (IRMC), both of which provide high-quality cancer care right in the proverbial backyards of Armstrong and Indiana county residents.

The National Cancer Institute has estimated there are more than 100 different types of cancer. With cancer still being the second leading cause of death, after heart disease, in both men and women nationally, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), chances are most people know someone who’s had the disease.

The Community College of Allegheny County Wellness Committee sponsored the first CCAC Paddle & Pedal Event on Oct. 5. Participants enjoyed a relaxing kayak ride down the Allegheny River and biked back on the river trail. Although parts of the journey had unexpected challenges, the group worked together. The obstacles created more group interactions and resulted in a more eventful time than anticipated.

As temperatures begin to rise and gray skies turn to blue, we feel the urge to get outdoors and get active again after another long winter. There is weight to be lost, muscle to be toned, and work to your home and yard that must be addressed; but if you’ve neglected to do anything remotely physical during the winter you’ll have to warm up the engine before kicking things into high gear.

There are plenty of cliches and puns about vision, including “the eyes are the window to the soul,” “a sight for sore eyes” and even “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” But eyesight is certainly no laughing matter.

Millions of Americans live with diabetes every day. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2018, 34.2 million Americans, or 10.5 percent of the population, had diabetes. Among new cases, 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. In 2015, 88 million Americans ages 18 and older had prediabetes. Check out our tips on how to best prevent diabetes naturally and how to spot the signs early on.

Staying at home during the coronavirus outbreak can help you avoid contracting the potentially deadly pathogen. Arming your immune system and creating a natural shield by eating foods rich in essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants can help you fight off an infection, whether it is COVID-19 or other viruses and bacterium.

You’ve likely read a lot about the coronavirus or talked about it with friends or co-workers. It’s been on almost every major news outlet website, newspaper or TV station in the last few months. The coronavirus was first detected in China, and it’s now been detected in about 60 locations internationally, including the U.S., according to the Centers and Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

There’s no shortage of medical information on the internet; so, when it comes to men and prostate cancer, how do you separate myth from fact? What about dated and current information?

It’s time to face the facts: The incessant noise of modern life never seems to stop. It also seems that persistent and loud environmental noise — traffic, construction, urban racket and even war may cause or contribute to cardiovascular problems.

As we all know, America, and the world, is facing an unprecedented time right now. Many people are working from home or out of work completely, and many schools are in their first week of closures. This means that parents and students are experiencing a time that they likely haven’t before, in which the whole family is home together all day, every day.

For many women, giving birth to a baby may trigger an assortment of emotions, including joy, excitement, anxiety and even fear. But it could also lead to something you may not expect. Most new mothers experience a milder form of depression, sometimes commonly called “the baby blues,” after childbirth. Other new moms, however, can experience a more severe, long-lasting form called postpartum depression.

Dr. Rajeev Pillai, IRMC’s interventional cardiologist, has during his three years at IRMC diagnosed several cases of Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection (SCAD) an uncommon but emergent condition. SCAD occurs when a tear forms in a blood vessel in the heart. Affecting mostly women in their 40s and 50s, though it can occur at any age and in men, patients with the condition report symptoms of a heart attack.

If you’re on the hunt for a workout that will help you burn major calories, sculpt your upper and lower body and lower stress levels, then look no further. It may be time for you to put on a pair of gloves and try boxing. It’s a one-stop sweat that can leave you feeling great from the inside out.

Discussing mental health has become less taboo in modern culture than it used to be before, and that openness is now also crossing over into the workplace. However, many organizations still seem to be falling behind on this trend. From unrealistic, demanding deadlines to heavy workloads and long hours to even shifting performance priorities, there’s often never a shortage of stress at work.

For many women, giving birth to a baby may trigger an assortment of emotions including joy, excitement, anxiety and even fear. But it could also lead to something you may not expect. Many new mothers experience a mild form of depression, sometimes called “the baby blues.” Others, however, can experience a more severe, long-lasting medical condition known as postpartum depression.

On Jan. 14, Community Health published story titled "No More Body Shaming" that contained quotes from a source who levied unfounded allegations of impropriety against White Rock Montessori school in Dallas. Allegations that White Rock Montessori condoned or allowed instances of body shaming against students, and is now retaliating against the children of parents who raise such issues with the school, are unsubstantiated and solely the opinion of the source quoted in the story. Community Health apologizes to White Rock Montessori for any harm that has come to its reputation and its business as a respected educational institute as a result of the statements contained in the story.

As families come face to face with medical requirements every school year, the country is feeling the effects of a vaccine resistance movement that’s been decades in the making. In a climate of fake news and ever-growing misinformation that is spread online, it can be hard to decipher the false information from the truth. That’s why Facebook is taking a stand.

If you are looking for a yoga studio in Montgomery County, perhaps Kindred Yoga is for you.

Your life is busy. Work, appointments, grocery shopping, cooking, driving your kids around – there are all sorts of excuses to put off getting an annual influenza (flu) vaccine. To make it easier for its employees to get their flu shot, Colonial School District holds an annual flu shot clinic at its Central District Office. This is the fifth year the district has held its clinic on Oct. 21.

Discussing mental health has become less taboo in modern culture than it used to be before, and that openness is now also crossing over into the workplace. However, many organizations still seem to be falling behind on this trend. From unrealistic, demanding deadlines to heavy workloads and long hours to even shifting performance priorities, there’s often never a shortage of stress at work.

Almost immediately after birth a child begins to imitate their parents. They mimic mannerisms and behaviors such as smiling when their parents smile, make similar noises and, when they are old enough to talk, they repeat what parents say.

The American Society for the Positive Care of Children estimates that child abuse reports involve 7.5 million children, and child abuse crosses all socioeconomic and educational levels, religions, ethnic and cultural groups. The National Children’s Alliance has reported that nearly 700,000 children are abused in the U.S annually. Childhelp.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention and treatment of child abuse, found that a report of child abuse is made every 10 seconds.

One way to achieve mental health, happiness and clarity is through meditation. What meditation does is uniquely dynamic — allowing your whole being to open up, decluttering your thoughts, feelings and emotions into a positive state of confidence.

In 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency, and it announced a five-point strategy to battle the opioid epidemic. Since then, the fight has been nonstop, with mainstream approaches like medicine and counseling, legislation like the 2018 Opioid Crisis Response Act, and even more holistic ways like using medical marijuana.

An estimated 5.8 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2019, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This includes an estimated 5.6 million people age 65 and older and 200,000 people younger than 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia. It’s a disease that Amy Losak of Teaneck, New Jersey, knows all too well.

Vaping has come of age in the most perfect of social conditions. Smoking cigarettes is falling out of favor socially and even among nicotine users, and is wholly rejected by many young people today. To get their fix they're turning to what is marketed as a cleaner and safer method of ingestion. Enticing flavors, edgy technology and social media are empowering the tobacco industry to ensnare a new generation with nicotine addiction
by way of vaping. And it’s working. In 2016, 43.8% of high schoolers in New York state tried vaping, more than double the total two years prior. This trend has Ontario County officials deeply concerned.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is caused when an individual witnesses or experiences a tragic event. Though they may not surface for months or years, symptoms include sleeplessness, depression, a heightened state of anxiety, flashbacks to the event and avoidance of places, people or activities that are reminders of the trauma. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), 7.7 million adults in the U.S. live with PTSD, though women are more likely to develop this condition.

With spring finally in the air, most of us can’t wait to get outside and soak up some sun. With May being Skin Cancer Awareness Month, it's a great time to be reminded about the importance of skin care, particularly when it comes to protecting it from damaging and potentially cancer-causing ultraviolet radiation.

Junior high school is a critical time of growth and development for students. Whether they’re trying to make new friends, join an extracurricular activity or sport, or navigate a homecoming dance, youths within that demographic are full of emotions they might not know how to express or cope with.

An estimated 5.8 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2019, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This includes an estimated 5.6 million people age 65 and older and 200,000 people younger than 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia. It’s a disease that Amy Losak of Teaneck, New Jersey, knows all too well.

Recent estimates have shown that about one in six American children between ages 3 and 17 have one or more developmental disabilities — impairments in learning, language, physical or behavior. These conditions begin during the developmental period, can affect everyday functioning, and generally last throughout a person’s life.